Wiretapping scandal set 36: The Minister’s housing issue

 

From this 36th conversations set, presented at the Camp of freedom which was set in front of the Government building, we find out that the government is a lucrative business – it brings huge earnings and allows quick enriching.

 

In the first conversation from this short set, led by Gordana Jankuloska and Zoran Stavreski, we can hear that the Minister of Interior and her husband bought two apartments – and this was Stavreski’s idea. As SDSM’s spokesman Petre Shilegov clarified at the presentation of this conversations set, Jankuloska’s apartments are in the attic of the building across the MOI, and SDSM had a special press conference regarding this issue. Additionally, Zoran Stavreski is also interested for an apartment in the famous building at 20 Dimche Mirchev street, where plenty officials and MPs from VMRO-DPMNE already have apartments there. He has already made the first steps, he visited the construction firm to see what kind of apartments are left. However, he is afraid that he will be seen, so Jankuloska advises him that he can enter the building directly in a car. She also tells him when to come – at dusk, when there are only several construction workers there… Nevertheless, he decides to make an appointment with the director of the construction firm, but no construction worker should be present at the top floors of the building at the time when Stavreski is going to be there.

After all of this is resolved, there is just one more problem for Stavreski. He is worried about the public’s reaction regarding his purchase of a new apartment, especially because he will have to register it in his personal property statement that is submitted to the Anti-corruption commission. Jankuloska also says that this was her food for thought too – and until the moment this conversation is led, she hadn’t registered her two apartments.

 

PRACTICAL PEOPLE IN “VMRO” BUILDING

In the next three conversations, Jankuloska tells her assistant Ivo Kotevski how she and her husband took a credit for the apartments and how they are furnishing them, because they are “very practical people”. Then, in a conversation occurring after SDSM has published the information about Jankuloska’s two apartments in the “VMRO” building, Kotevski says that it can be assumed what the media will write, regardless the given answers. He says the media will accuse that Jankuloska purchased two apartments when there are too many poor people… Then in the third conversation we hear Jankuloska asking: “Well, who is going to tell them Ivo?!” and she tries to convince him that the critical media will say a thing or two about her apartments once, twice, five times the most – and then “everything will fade out”. Also, she states that it is advantageous that this whole thing is from 2011, and there have been two years since then until the moment of the conversation… In the third conversation Kotevski finally understands which is the building with his boss’ apartments – in the building “you see from your window”. He, after hearing speculations from a friend, first thought that the apartments are in the building across the Ministry of Culture’s yard. Then they start joking. Kotevski wonders where will the policeman that is supposed to guard Jankuloska be situated, and she responds “at the front desk right here”, and he is joking that the policeman will come to work as usual – at MOI’s front desk, alongside with the other policemen on duty.

In the final conversation we hear the confirmation that Stavreski and Jankuloska became neighbors after all. And when it comes to the furnishing of the apartments and how they look like, what are the ideas of vice-Prime Minister’s wife about their apartment – we hear all that in the last and longest conversation from this set.

 

All of the “bombs” are here.

 

Press conference of Petre Shilegov, spokesman of SDSM, in Skopje, 31st of May 2015


This article was created within the framework of the Project to increase the accountability of the politicians and political parties Truthmeter implemented by Metamorphosis. The article is made possible by the generous support of the National Endowment for Democracy(NED) and The Balkan Trust for Democracy (BTD), a project of the German Marshall Fund of the United States, an initiative that supports democracy, good governance, and Euroatlantic integration in Southeastern Europe. The content is the responsibility of its author and does not necessarily reflect the views of Metamorphosis, National Endowment for Democracy, the Balkan Trust for Democracy, the German Marshall Fund of the United States, or its partners.

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