The Claim That There Are Magnetic Microchips in the Vaccine is Disinformation

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Vaccines do not contain microchips. The whole drama with alleged microchips, through which the population will be monitored, has nothing to do with reality. In fact, the US Company ApiJect is considering an “optional microchip”, but it would be on the syringe label and would not be injected during immunization. It is important to say that this microchip is intended only for the United States and not for Macedonia. This technology is completely optional and the US government has not yet decided whether to use it or not! Moreover, vaccines from any manufacturer do not contain metals. The dose of the vaccine is less than one milliliter. The standard dose of Pfizer contains 0.3 milliliters. That is not enough volume to fit a microchip, even if someone would want to do something like that.

 

In a Facebook post, four videos have been posted showing magnets sticking to people’s shoulders. All four videos claim that the reason the magnets stick to their shoulder is that these people received the Covid-19 vaccine and that it actually causes a magnetizing reaction.

In the post that is the subject of our interest, they go a step further and claim that in the bodies of the vaccinated persons there are magnetic microchips.

Covid-19 vaccinated. Magnetic microchips. Covid-19 is a scam, a plan to depopulate humanity. Reject vaccination, the author claims.

This “mantra” on vaccine rejection and a plan to depopulate humanity since the beginning of the pandemic, and especially since the beginning of the vaccination process, has been repeatedly shared on the same FB profile by Mike Tyson.

As we have written before, this profile is infamous for spreading anti-vaccine propaganda, in a way that manipulates video materials and facts, presents half-truths and untruths.

First of all, let us discuss the chips. Vaccines do not contain microchips. The whole drama with alleged microchips, through which the population will be monitored, has nothing to do with reality.

What are they actually talking about?

The US Company ApiJekt is considering an “optional microchip”, but it would be on the label of the syringe and would not be injected during immunization. It is important to note that this microchip is currently intended only for the United States, not for Macedonia, and its purpose, as confirmed for Reuters by company spokesman Steve Hoffman, is as follows:

  1. To allow the healthcare provider to confirm that the actual injectable and the vaccine in it has not expired and that it is not counterfeit.
  2. To confirm that that particular injection has been used. 

The healthcare provider would use a mobile application to view this information or enter it into the system. All this would be done without entering any personal data about the patient. The information in this application will only apply to doses and syringes, i.e. the vaccine, not to humans.

As it can be seen from the following link, this technology is completely optional and the US government has not yet decided whether to use it or not! The company ApiJekt does not produce vaccines, but only fills them in their syringes, so that they are available for use. The chip will not collect personal data or information about who received the dose, but will allow the healthcare provider to know when the dose has expired and whether it is counterfeit.

As for the videos in the post we are reviewing, which show magnets sticking to the shoulders of several people who claim to have been vaccinated (it cannot be confirmed that they have been vaccinated at all), it is certainly not a consequence of the vaccine. Vaccines from any manufacturer do not contain metals.

The dose of the vaccine is less than one milliliter. The standard dose of Pfizer contains 0.3 milliliters. That is not enough volume to fit a microchip, even if one wishes to do so. Even a whole dose injected containing ferromagnetic metal would still not be enough to create the effect of the videos. During an examination of the composition of the Pfizer vaccine, it can be seen that it contains mRNA lipids, potassium chloride, sodium chloride, and sucrose. So, it mainly contains lipids, proteins, salts and sugars. Lipids, proteins, salts and sugars can be found in most foods and are not ferromagnetic metals.

The fact that some people stick a magnet on their shoulder and then claim that it is from the vaccine is not proof that they have a microchip in their body. It is not known what they use on the magnets so that they can stick, whether it is glue, whether it is an adhesive tape, whether it is just sweat from the hand, writes the renowned “Forbes”.

“Your body is made up of exactly the same kind of biological building blocks [as the materials in the vaccine], so there is simply no way that injecting a tiny fragment of this material could have any impact. Most food is made of similar molecules, and eating food doesn’t make people magnetic.”biomedical technology professor Al Edwards told Fullfact.

Instagram has already started to blur videos with such content because experts confirm that it is not true that the vaccine contains any ingredient that can make them magnetizing.

Thus, Dr Celine Gounder, infectious disease specialist and epidemiologist point out that in the list of ingredients in vaccines, there is no iron.

 Iron is one of the most common metals used in magnetic materials, but you will see no mention of iron in the components of vaccines.  Many multivitamins contain iron, and you don’t see people becoming magnetized or having magnets sticking to them after taking that vitamin.she said.

The fact-checking of the USA Today newspaper and a conversation with experts also revealed that this was misinformation.

The claim that the Covid-19 vaccine can cause a magnetic reaction is unfounded and foolish. Vaccines do not magnetize your shoulder. This seems like the person in the video just stuck the magnet to their arm (with sweat, etc) – said virologist Angela Rasmussen, affiliated with Georgetown University.

The lies about the alleged chip in the vaccine and the shoulder have reached Australia.

The internal dimension of the needle is 0.3 mm. The chip would have to be a fraction of this to prevent it from getting stuck. I think it is not possible, especially because a transmitter would have to be installed as well. In order for the microchip to pass through this vaccination needle, it would have to be less than ten thousandths of a millimeter, write fact-checkers from Australia.

Since all the experts agree that there is nothing in the composition of the vaccines that causes a magnetizing reaction, but that it is probably a tape on the metal disk being applied to the skin, we deem the post we are reviewing as disinformation. Such lies and conspiracy theories aim to strengthen anti-vaccination propaganda in the country, inflicting unforeseeable consequences on public health and the global effort to combat the Covid-19 pandemic with the immunization process.

 

 

 

 

 

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